Why Goat Yoga?

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For three years now this farm has been hosting goat yoga. In the Winter we do it with the newborns in our warm(ish) hoop house, in the Spring we float between the hoop house and the pasture (weather dictating) with the now teenagers, and in the Summer we head into the big pasture with the working girls (at this point the teenagers are too big and borderline dangerous). It’s a fun cycle and one that we feel incredibly grateful to be able to offer to our community.

You may be thinking to yourself…who are these people who pay money to come do yoga in a field with goats? And, more importantly, what makes goat yoga so special?

I’ve actually spent a lot of time thinking about this and I think I finally have an answer.

Goat yoga isn’t real yoga. Yes you’re led through a 50-minute Vinyasa flow and we hit all the poses. We focus on breathing and moving your body intentionally, just like a conventional yoga class. But that’s where the similarities fade.

Because in this yoga class there are animals moving freely among you, pooping, farting, sneezing (often at the same time) and giving zero foxes if they offend anyone along the way.

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It’s empowering to be around a creature that isn’t susceptible to the pressure of social norms. It’s freeing to laugh at farts. It’s fun to be the center of attention (which in a field full of goats you most definitely are). It’s magical to laugh with reckless abandon with a group of strangers because a goat dropped a pile of milk duds on your mat.

It’s the best feeling in the world to silence your internal critic and JUST BE.

Our farm is one of the most non-judgmental places you can visit.

Goat yoga is even less judgmental.

We don’t care if you’ve never done yoga in your life.

We don’t care if you don’t plan on doing 90% of the moves while in our class.

We don’t care if your friend or partner drug you to our farm kicking and screaming.

We care that, once you get here, you open your mind to the possibility that rolling around in a pasture with a herd of goats is fun. You laugh, often harder than you have in a while, and you find some peace in the moment.

This world we live in is full of sadness and misery. All you have to do is turn on the news for 10 seconds and you’ll see something that literally breaks your heart. On top of that, we live in a time when we, as humans, are expected to accomplish extreme successes every single day of our lives in order to feel like we’re contributing to society.

Imagine attending a class in which the only expectation put in front of you is to have fun.

And on top of that. When you come to a goat yoga session you’re helping support a local goat dairy. Goat yoga helps pay our alfalfa bill. That means we’re able to keep our wholesale cheese costs low enough that we can compete against larger confinement goat farms in the grocery store. In case you didn’t know, most grocery stores mark-up their products 100%. Because of goat yoga and other agritourism events on our farm, we’re able to wholesale at a price that, even after their markup, makes our cheese the same price as it would be if you were buying from us at a farmer’s market.

Goat yoga is a ridiculous thing. That fact is not lost on us.

This farm is ridiculous. It always has been and it always will be. But just because something is ridiculous doesn’t mean it’s therapeutic.

And that’s just what goat yoga is.

If you’d like to attend a goat yoga class they’re always posted on our website: www.lostpeacock.com/events We would love to see you!

This is my very favorite Great Uncle Van. We hosted our family reunion at the farm this past Saturday. Those that were still in town stayed for breakfast on Sunday. I was over the moon happy when Uncle Van jumped into the goat yoga class and had the very best time.

This is my very favorite Great Uncle Van. We hosted our family reunion at the farm this past Saturday. Those that were still in town stayed for breakfast on Sunday. I was over the moon happy when Uncle Van jumped into the goat yoga class and had the very best time.





Rachael Taylor-Tuller